A fond farewell

As it’s coming to the end of this years season here at the Casino, sadly my 6 month stint as blog writer for Paradise Lost: Lord Charlemont’s Garden at Marino has come to an end! I hope that you have enjoyed my posts and that they have made you curious about the exhibition curated by Mary Heffernan and Dr Rose Anne White and the wonderful garden paradise that Charlemont created here at Marino!

(L-R) Paradise Lost curators Dr. Rose Anne White and Mary Heffernan with Dr. Romily Turton and OPW Chairman Clare McGrath

(L-R) Paradise Lost curators Dr. Rose Anne White and Mary Heffernan with Dr. Romily Turton and OPW Chairman Clare McGrath

We’ve had a great season here, with so many local, national and international visitors coming to see the exhibition, as well as groups like the Irish Architecture Foundation Members, Marino Institute of Education Staff and the Northern Ireland Heritage Gardens Committee. A highlight was, of course, the Irish Georgian Society Annual Study Day which we were delighted was on Paradise Lost this year! There were amazing speakers throughout the day, as well as great debate and so much information! You can check out some photos of the day on our Facebook page!

IGS Study Day with Dr. Romilly Turton, Dr. Matthew Jebb and Patrick Bowe

IGS Study Day with Dr. Romilly Turton, Dr. Matthew Jebb and Patrick Bowe

William Laffan and Kevin V. Mulligan presented their new research ‘Accomodating the ‘graces of sculpture': drawings by Giovanni Battista Cipriani for the attic statuary of the Casino at Marino’, in the Irish Architectural and Decorative Studies (XVI) Journal of The Irish Georgian Society. You can read the opening paragraphs of the article for free here (courtesy Gandon Editions, the authors and the Irish Georgian Society).

Giovanni Battista Cipriani (1727–1785) Venus Revised (1767) Private Collection Pencil, pen and black ink , 25 x 12 cm

Giovanni Battista Cipriani (1727–1785)
Venus Revised (1767)
Pencil, pen and black ink , 25 x 12 cm. Private Collection

There were great articles in the Irish Arts Review Spring 2014 edition by Rose Anne White and in the IAR Autumn edition by Dr Ruth Musielak (who also wrote the text for the exhibition catalogue), in the Irish Times, The Phoenix and a lovely piece by Seamus O’Brien, Head Gardener at Kilmacurragh Arboretum, National Botanic Gardens, in The Irish Garden Magazine.

Irish Arts Review Autumn 2014, Portrait of a Landscape, Dr. Ruth Musielak

Irish Arts Review Autumn 2014, Portrait of a Landscape, Dr. Ruth Musielak

Paradise Lost curator Dr. Rose Anne White was interviewed about the exhibition on Dublin City 103.2fm on ‘Looking Back‘ the local history show, with Donal OhUllachain. Here’s the link to the podcast and the interview starts about 10.30 minutes in. Rose Anne also took part in a very interesting Irish History Reddit ‘Ask Me Anything‘, where users could literally ask her anything!

A huge thank you goes to the following institutions for their enthusiastic collaboration.

Dublin City Archives
Dublin City Gallery the Hugh Lane
Glucksman Map Library, Trinity College Dublin
Marino Institute of Education
Ordnance Survey Ireland
The Irish Georgian Society
The Lewis Walpole Library
The National Gallery of Ireland
The National Library of Ireland
The National Photographic Archive
The Royal Irish Academy
Yale Center for British Art

Within and alongside these, we are very grateful to Patrick Bowe, Mary Broderick, Matthew Cains, Margarita Cappock, Christine Casey, Patrick and Vicky Earley, Honora Faul, Paul Ferguson, Siobhán Fitzpatrick, Ciarán Fogarty, Emmeline Henderson, Anne Hodge, Patricia Hyde, William Laffan, Sandra McDermott, Dave McKeon, Síle McNulty-Goodwin, Ruth Musielak, Franc Myles, John O’Connell, Finola O’Kane, John Redmill, Finola Reid, Petra Schnabel, and Romilly Turton.

View of the Casino from the side of the Gothic Seat

View of the Casino from the side of the Gothic Seat

Special thanks to all at the Office of Public Works, who worked tirelessly to make the idea of Paradise Lost a reality, especially the team at the Casino, Alexandra Caccamo, John Cahill, Denis Carr, Willie Cumming, Colette Davis, Mick Doyle, Liam Egan, John Hayes, Matthew Jebb, Adrian Kennedy, Pauline Kennedy, David Levins, Clare McGrath, John McMahon, George Moir, Jacquie Moore, Elizabeth Morgan, Ciaran Murtagh, Aisling Ní Bhriain, Melissa O’Brien, Seamus O’Brien, and Ray Rafferty.

The exhibition and catalogue were expertly brought to life by the following specialists. Thank you to Audrey Brennan Productions, Conservation Letterfrack, Davison Photography, Gerard Crowley Modelmakers, Ingenious Ireland and Pat Liddy, Nicholson and Bass, Space Creative, Vermillion Design, and the Wellesley Ashe Gallery.

Thomas Roberts (1748–1777) A Landscape with the Casino at Marino (1773) Facsimile. Details of original: Oil on canvas, 62 x 96 cm

Thomas Roberts (1748–1777) A Landscape with the Casino at Marino (1773) Facsimile. Details of original: Oil on canvas, 62 x 96 cm. Whitworth Gallery, Manchester, UK.

Don’t forget that you can come and visit the exhibition 7 days a week until the 31st of October, from 10am to 4pm, and you can always come back to the website here for reference. You will also still be able to download the walking tour app, specially commisioned by Ingenious Ireland, from the website, which especially with the autumn colours in the landscape, makes for a wonderful walk! And if you would like to contact us you can email curator@paradiselostexhibition.com or you can find us at casinomarino@opw.ie.

It has been exciting writing the blog and getting to spend time with the works and really study them over the summer and I hope you’ve enjoyed it too! I’d like to say thank you to all our followers and readers and with that I’ll sign off!

Best wishes

Melissa

The man himself!

I’ve mentioned Lord Charlemont many many times in this blog, so decided that today I would show you the wonderful portrait that we have of him in the Paradise Lost exhibition!

William Cuming (1769–1852) (attrib.) James, Earl of Charlemont, First President 1785-1799 Facsimile. Details of original: Oil on canvas, 127 x 103 cm, Royal Irish Academy.

William Cuming (1769–1852) (attrib.) James, Earl of Charlemont, First President 1785-1799, Facsimile. Details of original: Oil on canvas, 127 x 103 cm, Royal Irish Academy.

The original hangs in the Royal Irish Academy, which is very fitting as Lord Charlemont was a founding member and the First President of the RIA!

The portrait is filled with symbols of his great loves! Dr Nicola Figgis has noted a number of identifying motifs, such as the statue, pen, and Casino which represent his great collections, his learning, and his estate at Marino.

Detail of William Cuming (1769–1852) (attrib.) James, Earl of Charlemont, First President 1785-1799 Facsimile. Details of original: Oil on canvas, 127 x 103 cm, Royal Irish Academy.

Detail of William Cuming (1769–1852) (attrib.)
James, Earl of Charlemont, First President 1785-1799 Facsimile. Details of original:
Oil on canvas, 127 x 103 cm, Royal Irish Academy.

The really special thing about this portrait, in relation to the landscape here at Marino,  is that in the top left hand corner, in the tree line, you can actually see the silhouette of the Casino Marino!

Detail of William Cuming (1769–1852) (attrib.) James, Earl of Charlemont, First President 1785-1799 Facsimile. Details of original: Oil on canvas, 127 x 103 cm,Royal Irish Academy.

Detail of William Cuming (1769–1852) (attrib.) James, Earl of Charlemont, First President 1785-1799 Facsimile. Details of original: Oil on canvas, 127 x 103 cm,Royal Irish Academy.

Curiously this portrait was painted after the Earl had died in 1799, and was based on a miniature watercolour of his bust which had been produced by Horace Hone in 1788.

best wishes

Melissa

Portrait of a Landscape

If you read the Irish Arts Review Autumn 2014 you might have spotted a great article by Dr Ruth Musielak ‘Portrait of a Landscape’ in the current edition. Dr. Ruth Musielak was awarded a PhD in History of Art from UCD in 2013, a chapter of which formed the basis of the catalogue ‘Charlemont’s Marino: Portrait of a Landscape’, to accompany the Paradise Lost exhibition.

Irish Arts Review Autumn 2014, 'Portrait of a Landscape', Dr. Ruth Musielak, p122-113

Irish Arts Review Autumn 2014, ‘Portrait of a Landscape’, Dr. Ruth Musielak, p122-113

Dr. Musielak details some historical views of the area, focusing on the view of Dublin bay from the vicinity of Charlemont’s Marino demesne. Works from William Ashford, Thomas Roberts, as well as Mary Delany, Thomas Leeson Rowbotham and Edward McFarland feature, many of which are represented in the Paradise Lost exhibition.

If you’re interested in further reading on the Marino Landscape, the catalogue for Paradise Lost is of course available from reception here at the Casino. Designed by Liam Furlong, it’s a treasure trove of fascinating information!

Best wishes

Melissa

Of various illusions

If you’ve been following the Paradise Lost blog, you might know that I’m a bit of a printmaking nerd and that some of my favourite pieces in the exhibition are the truly wonderful prints!

I’ve mentioned the stunning Daniel Havell aquatint from the Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane, and the gorgeous mezzotint of Matthew Peters, from the National Gallery of Ireland, but another excellent print hangs in the Upper Landing of the Casino, a fine example of an original intaglio print, by the renowned architectural printmaker Edward Rooker (1712-1774), very kindly on loan from a private collection. Engraved after a Thomas Ivory‘s watercolour, the prints were sold for half a guinea each in the 18th century!

Edward Rooker (c. 1712–1774) after Thomas Ivory (c. 1732–1786) View of his Lordship’s Casine at Marino (c. 1774) Ink on paper, 62.5 x 46.5 cm, Private Collection.

Edward Rooker (c. 1712–1774) after Thomas Ivory (c. 1732–1786) View of his Lordship’s Casine at Marino (c. 1774) Ink on paper, 62.5 x 46.5 cm, Private Collection.

Curiously this very accomplished Edward Rooker intaglio shows the Casino as it was designed, not as it was actually constructed. The attic statues, designed by Cipriani, are shown with Bacchus on the left, while Ceres is shown on the right, however when the building was constructed they were positioned the opposite way around!

(L) Ceres and Bacchus, Casino Attic (R) Detail from Edward Rooker (c. 1712–1774) after Thomas Ivory (c. 1732–1786) View of his Lordship’s Casine at Marino (c. 1774) Ink on paper, 62.5 x 46.5 cm, Private Collection.

(L) Ceres and Bacchus, Casino Attic (R) Detail from Edward Rooker (c. 1712–1774) after Thomas Ivory (c. 1732–1786) View of his Lordship’s Casine at Marino (c. 1774) Ink on paper, 62.5 x 46.5 cm, Private Collection.

Another noticeable difference is that the entrance in the wall to the basement level on the east side is missing! A great illustration of one of the illusions of the Casino can be seen in the print, as the ornamental urns on the roof are actually expelling smoke from their chimneys hidden within!

Detail from Edward Rooker (c. 1712–1774) after Thomas Ivory (c. 1732–1786)  View of his Lordship’s Casine at Marino (c. 1774) Ink on paper, 62.5 x 46.5 cm, Private Collection.

Detail from Edward Rooker (c. 1712–1774) after Thomas Ivory (c. 1732–1786)
View of his Lordship’s Casine at Marino (c. 1774) Ink on paper, 62.5 x 46.5 cm, Private Collection.

The print is full of atmosphere with a group and their little dog viewing the Casino from the east lawn, a gentleman about to ascend the front steps, and of course the mysterious figure in the doorway! Could that be Charlemont himself?

Detail from Edward Rooker (c. 1712–1774) after Thomas Ivory (c. 1732–1786)  View of his Lordship’s Casine at Marino (c. 1774) Ink on paper, 62.5 x 46.5 cm, Private Collection.

Detail from Edward Rooker (c. 1712–1774) after Thomas Ivory (c. 1732–1786)View of his Lordship’s Casine at Marino (c. 1774) Ink on paper, 62.5 x 46.5 cm, Private Collection.

As I mentioned above, Rookers print was based on Ivory’s painting, which was made in 1772, around the same time the Casino was completed, so it is curious that Ivory was working from plans or designs of the Casino. Even more curious is that Rooker would have been very familiar with William Chambers designs for the Casino, as he himself contributed plates for Chambers Treatise on Civil Architecture in 1759!

Best wishes

Melissa

A lost drawing, an Egyptian Room

The ancient temples, classical architecture and landscaped gardens that Charlemont experienced on his nine year Grand Tour, hugely influenced the design of the ornamental features on the landscape at the Marino demesne. During his epic tour Charlemont also travelled to Egypt. There he visited Alexandria and Cairo, crawled through the pyramids at Giza and Saqqara, sailed up the Nile, and travelled through the desert, so it may come as no surprise that at Marino he had plans for an Egyptian Room… which unfortunately was never built.

Johann Heinrich Müntz (1727–1798) Plan for an Egyptian Room (1762) Facsimile. Details of original: 26.4 x 26 cm. Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University.

Johann Heinrich Müntz (1727–1798) Plan for an Egyptian Room (1762) Facsimile. Details of original: 26.4 x 26 cm. Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University.

The Egyptian Room exists only in two beautiful plans made by Johann Heinrich Müntz, now both in the collection of the Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University. Both drawings were exhibited by Müntz with the Society of Artists in 1762, with a notation on the back stating, ‘Plan of an Egyptian building for the Rt. Hon. Viscount Charlemont to be executed in Ireland. J.H. Müntz 1762’.

Above you can see Müntz’ ‘Plan for an Egyptian Room’, oval in shape, it’s intended location at Marino remains unknown. Notes on the drawing itself include a ‘fireplace’ beside a ‘funnel’, as well as ‘shutter to run up and down’, a feature that was in existence at the Casino, and may show Müntz‘s familiarity with Chambers’ designs.

Johann Heinrich Müntz (1727–1798) Section of Lord Charlemont’s Egyptian Room (1762) Facsimile. Details of original: 26.5 x 26.8 cm. Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University.

Johann Heinrich Müntz (1727–1798) Section of Lord Charlemont’s Egyptian Room (1762) Facsimile. Details of original: 26.5 x 26.8 cm. Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University.

Of the two drawings, the section seen above is drawn in the most detail, with the floor marked as such, just above the curved vaulted basement, which would have been a crypt. Included in the main level, which seems raised above ground level, there is much ornamentation, three arches complete with urns and a single bust in the central arch.

Mysteriously, there was also a third drawing by Müntz, which has not survived. It is thought that this third drawing was an Elevation of the Egyptian Room, which if it is ever discovered, would be very very fascinating to see!

Best Wishes

Melissa

Of friends and neighbours

One of Lord Charlemont’s closest neighbours here at Marino, was the renowned letter writer, social commentator and artist, Mrs Delany. In 1743 she married Dr. Patrick Delany and moved from England with him to Delville House near Glasnevin, not far from Charlemont’s Marino.

You may be well familiar by now with Charlemont’s love of horticulture, and his growing of pineapples at Marino. As part of Paradise Lost we have a selection of 18th century letters read aloud, one of which is by Mrs. Delany herself! She is writing from the North of Ireland at the time, and thanks Charlemont for his kind gift of 10 pineapples! A symbol of friendship and welcome, pineapples were rare in Ireland at the time and you would be extremely lucky to receive one, never mind 10! She goes on to say that they were ‘as fine as any I’ve tasted’. This aural exhibit, produced by Audrey Brennan, was specially commissioned for Paradise Lost.

Mary Delany (1700–1788) A View of Part of the Little Grove of Evergreens at Delville with the Country beyond it and Bay of Dublin (1744) Facsimile. Details of original: Ink, graphite, and wash on paper, National Gallery of Ireland.

Mary Delany (1700–1788) A View of Part of the Little Grove of Evergreens at Delville with the Country beyond it and Bay of Dublin (1744) Facsimile. Details of original: Ink, graphite, and wash on paper, National Gallery of Ireland.

As you can see above we also have a facsimile of a beautiful delicate ink, graphite, and wash drawing by Mrs. Delany herself, in Paradise Lost. From a sketch book and titled A View of Part of the Little Grove of Evergreens at Delville with the Country beyond it and Bay of Dublin (1744), the original is in the National Gallery of Ireland. This is the view from Delville looking towards Dublin Bay and is not dis-similar to views from Charlemont’s Marino, that can be seen in the Daniel Havell engraving, after Thomas Leeson Rowbotham of A View of Part of the Bay and City of Dublin from Marino (1817), from Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane.

havell_small

Daniel Havell (c. 1785–1822), engraving, after Thomas Leeson Rowbotham (1782–1853) A View of Part of the Bay and City of Dublin from Marino (1817) Facsimile. Details of original: Intaglio print on paper, 40.7 x 99.7 cm. Dublin City Gallery, the Hugh Lane

Best wishes
Melissa

Sundials and shadows

It’s hard to believe that August is here already and that the days are getting shorter so soon. There are many ways of marking the passing of time, but the sundial is one of the oldest known devices, used first by the Egyptians, and later the Chinese, the Greeks and the Romans. Despite the development of the mechanical clock in the 14th century, sundials became hugely popular from the 16th to the 18th century, primarily due to access to printed materials and the desire for craftsmen, mathematicians and astronomers to spread their knowledge. Well into the 19th century sundials were still used to check and adjust the accuracy of watches and clocks.

Seacombe Mason II (attrib.) Sundial (nineteenth century), Brass on Stone, Private Collection

Seacombe Mason II (attrib.) Sundial (nineteenth century), Brass on Stone, Private Collection

This brings me to a wonderful piece in the Paradise Lost Exhibition, a Victorian Sundial, by Seacombe Mason II, from a private collection. It is thought that this sundial was the centrepiece in the formal walled gardens in the nineteenth century, replacing a statue of a Fighting Gladiator by Simon Vierpyl. Historian Patrick Bowe has noted that the commissioning of this sundial may have coincided with the establishment of a new flower garden by the 2nd Countess of Charlemont, where it may have stood as centerpiece.

You can see from the close up below that the inscription reads ‘Mason, 6 Essex Bridge’, which identifies the sundial as being made by Seacombe Mason, who had established an ‘Optical and Mathematical Instrument‘ business in Dublin in 1780. Today they are known as Mason Technology and the current owner is Standish Mason, the seventh family generation to head up the company.

Detail of Seacombe Mason II (attrib.) Sundial (nineteenth century), Brass on Stone, Private Collection

Detail of Seacombe Mason II (attrib.) Sundial (nineteenth century), Brass on Stone, Private Collection

We are all so used to all our high-tech technology these days, our IPhones, computers and being able to access instant information, that when you see older technology and devices it can be extremely fascinating to see how simple and yet extremely effective they can be.

As you might know, Heritage Week 2014 is from the 23rd to the 31st of August this year…and if you have any littlies who might be interested, we have a fun-filled workshop exploring the science of sundials with Eoin Gill and Maths Week Ireland called ‘Sundials and Shadows’ on Sunday the 24th of August from 14.00 – 15.30. If you would like to book you can ring us on 01-8331618!

Best wishes

Melissa

Sublime swans

Apart from the beautiful and elegant garden structures, the designed landscape and unusal planting at Charlemont’s Marino gardens, there would have been other, possibly quite active, features in the gardens at Marino! I’ve mentioned the ornamental sheep which grazed the lands freely in previous posts, but there would also have been peacocks roaming, horses in the stables close to both Marino House and the formal gardens, and on the serene serpentine lakes which would have flowed through the Marino gardens in Charlemont’s time, there would have been swans!

Cecilia Margaret Campbell (1791–1857), Monument to Poor Cob (c. 1816), Facsimile. Details of original: Watercolour, 20 x 26.6 cm. Paul Mellon Collection, Yale Center for British Art

Cecilia Margaret Campbell (1791–1857), Monument to Poor Cob (c. 1816), Facsimile. Details of original: Watercolour, 20 x 26.6 cm. Paul Mellon Collection, Yale Center for British Art

You can see evidence of these swans in a number of pieces in the Paradise Lost exhibition. The Charlemont Album, a 19th century Caulfeild family scrapbook, now in the Yale Centre for British Art, gives us two clear views of these swans. The work shown above has been recently identified by Dr. Ruth Musielak as being by a young Dublin artist Cecilia Margaret Campbell. This wonderful watercolour shows a monument to poor Cob, a swan who died from a careless swipe of a scythe. The base is a stone, with a carving of a swan on the top, and to the left, the very sycthe which caused his demise.The painting is followed by ‘Elegy on Poor Cob’, a two page melancholy poem written as tribute or memorium to the fallen swan.

 this is a line of text

This very same monument can be seen in another piece in the exhibition! Below is a graphite drawing by Samuel Frederick Brocas, titled Swans Swimming Past an Island on a Lake, circa 1820, from the National Library of Ireland. Dr Ruth Musielak identified this Brocas as being in Marino by comparing it with the Campbell watercolour above. Both pieces show the same monument with the swan carving, the Brocas place it on an island in the lake, while the Campbell places it in Marino! So not a real swan at all, but a heartfelt monument to the fallen swan!

Samuel Frederick Brocas (c. 1792–1847) Swans Swimming Past an Island on a Lake (c. 1820). Facsimile. Details of original: Graphite on paper, 21.3 x 27.8 cm. National Library of Ireland

Samuel Frederick Brocas (c. 1792–1847) Swans Swimming Past an Island on a Lake (c. 1820). Facsimile. Details of original: Graphite on paper, 21.3 x 27.8 cm. National Library of Ireland

In a second Brocas drawing below, you can see the same pair of swans very happily gliding by on the serene lake. You can see the swans island again, and in the distance in the background the romantic Gothic Room!

Samuel Frederick Brocas (c. 1792–1847) Rosamond’s Bower: Lord Charlemont (c. 1820) Facsimile. Details of original: Graphite on paper, 25.8 x 39 cm. National Library of Ireland

Samuel Frederick Brocas (c. 1792–1847) Rosamond’s Bower: Lord Charlemont (c. 1820) Facsimile. Details of original: Graphite on paper, 25.8 x 39 cm. National Library of Ireland

A lovely thought is that the swan is a symbol of love and fidelity, so for Charlemont to have two swans on his serpentine lake would have made the scene serene and beautiful, but also quite romantic!

Best wishes

Melissa

Of serene serpentine lakes

Hot summer weather always makes me think of cooling down in the sea or chilling out in a beautiful serene lake. If you’re local to the Marino area you might just remember the swimming pool by the O’Brien Institute, now the Dublin Fire Brigade Training Centre. Some visitors who come to the Casino mention their memories of the swimming pool and ask where it has gone. The pool itself was a later addition or change to the lakes in the Marino gardens. Originally there was a string of three serpentine man made lakes, a very conscious element of the overal design of Lord Charlemont’s Marino demesne, on the very same site.

Below you can see the first time we see these lakes marked, on the Thomas Mathews A Map of the Lands of Donnycarney (1770) from the Dublin City Library and Archives. A singular lake appears to the north west of the Casino and to the south of the Gothic Room. A lovely loose hand drawn detail to note is a tiny swan swimming in the centre of the lake!

Detail of Thomas Mathews A Map of the Lands of Donnycarney (1770) Facsimile. Details of original: Pen and ink and watercolour on paper, 38 x 41 cm, Dublin City Library and Archives

Detail of Thomas Mathews, A Map of the Lands of Donnycarney (1770) Facsimile. Details of original: Pen and ink and watercolour on paper, 38 x 41 cm, Dublin City Library and Archives

Below you can see the wax and wane of the lakes charted in a progression of three maps. The first map below, on the left, is the Ordnance Survey of Dublin, Marino (1837) from the Ordnance Survey Ireland, where all three lakes are now fully formed and flow through the established walled gardens.

The centre map below is the Ordnance Survey of Dublin, Marino (1911, rev. 1907) from the Glucksman Map Library, Trinity College Dublin, now shows the swimming pool in place of the southern lake, followed by the Ordnance Survey of Dublin, Marino (1938, rev. 1935-6) also from the Glucksman Map Library, Trinity College Dublin. At this point in time all three lakes are gone, with only the swimming pool, of our visitors memory remaining!

(L-R) Detail of the Ordnance Survey of Dublin, Marino, Sheet 4, 1:15,000 (1837) Facsimile. Details of original: 63 x 97 cm, Ordnance Survey Ireland.  Detail of the Ordnance Survey of Dublin, Marino, Sheet 18–04, 1:2,500 (1911, rev. 1907) Facsimile. Details of original: 63 x 97 cm, Glucksman Map Library, Trinity College Dublin. Detail of the Ordnance Survey of Dublin, Marino, Sheet 18–04, 1:2500 (1938, rev. 1935-6) Facsimile. Details of original: 63 x 97 cm, Glucksman Map Library, Trinity College Dublin.

(Left) Detail of the Ordnance Survey of Dublin, Marino, Sheet 4, 1:15,000 (1837) Facsimile. Details of original: 63 x 97 cm, Ordnance Survey Ireland. (Centre) Detail of the Ordnance Survey of Dublin, Marino, Sheet 18–04, 1:2,500 (1911, rev. 1907) Facsimile. Details of original: 63 x 97 cm, Glucksman Map Library, Trinity College Dublin. (Right) Detail of the Ordnance Survey of Dublin, Marino, Sheet 18–04, 1:2500 (1938, rev. 1935-6) Facsimile. Details of original: 63 x 97 cm, Glucksman Map Library, Trinity College Dublin.

In 1876, almost forty years after the 1837 OS Map (above left), the Marino estate was sold by the third Earl to the Church. The Christian Brothers then transformed the lake into a swimming pool, which was finished in 1892. The photograph below, from the Lawrence Collection in the National Library of Ireland is The Temple, Marino, Clontarf (with lake), late nineteenth century, shows the Casino just before this point in time, with the serene serpentine lake still in place!

Lawrence Collection The Temple, Marino, Clontarf (with lake) (late nineteenth century) Facsimile . Details of original: Photograph, 22 x 17 cm. National Library of Ireland

Lawrence Collection The Temple, Marino, Clontarf (with lake) (late nineteenth century) Facsimile. Details of original: Photograph, 22 x 17 cm. National Library of Ireland

So if the temperature heats up again, where ever you are, over the next few days.. do think of the cooling waters of Marino and Lord Charlemont’s serpentine lakes!

Best wishes

Melissa

An unexpected view!

One of the amazing things about the Paradise Lost exhibition is that throughout the research for the exhibition, there have been some unexpected finds! In the run up to the exhibition launch a previously unpublished painting came to light, giving a view of the Marino Gardens and demesne  – the only known image from this perspective! It is the very exciting William Sadler II, A View of Dublin and Dublin Bay, from the estate of the Earl of Charlemont (c. 1810) and is oil on panel, very kindly on loan from a private collection.

William Sadler II (c. 1782-1839), A View of Dublin and Dublin Bay, from the estate of the Earl of Charlemont (c. 1810), Oil on panel, 36 x 55 cm, Private Collection

William Sadler II (c. 1782-1839), A View of Dublin and Dublin Bay, from the estate of the Earl of Charlemont (c. 1810), Oil on panel, 36 x 55 cm, Private Collection

It is very likely that Sadler is viewing Dublin Bay and the Marino demesne from the north-west corner of the Marino estate boundry. For comparision in today’s modern landscape, it would be from Collins Avenue, this link to Google Maps should give you an idea of the position. The curved pathway matches those seen in the 1867 Ordnance Survey, from the Glucksman Map Library, Trinity College Dublin, which you can see below.

Ordnance Survey of Dublin, Clonturk, Sheet 18–04, 1:2,500 (1867), Facsimile. Details of original: 63 x 97 cm, Glucksman Map Library, Trinity College Dublin

Ordnance Survey of Dublin, Clonturk, Sheet 18–04, 1:2,500 (1867), Facsimile. Details of original: 63 x 97 cm, Glucksman Map Library, Trinity College Dublin

On the left of the painting, the Casino on is seen on the hill, it’s columns and triangular pediment making it recognisable. Below you can see a close up of this section, with the farm and stable buildings of the walled garden to the fore of the photo and the Casino on the hill in the background.

Detail of the William Sadler II (c. 1782-1839) A View of Dublin and Dublin Bay, from the estate of the Earl of Charlemont (c. 1810) Oil on panel, 36 x 55 cm, Private Collection

Detail of the William Sadler II (c. 1782-1839), A View of Dublin and Dublin Bay, from the estate of the Earl of Charlemont (c. 1810), Oil on panel, 36 x 55 cm, Private Collection

A lovely detail from the painting is a horse and carraige, complete with driver, heading north along the path! Maybe…just maybe Charlemont himself is in the carraige!

Detail of the William Sadler II (c. 1782-1839), A View of Dublin and Dublin Bay, from the estate of the Earl of Charlemont (c. 1810) Oil on panel, 36 x 55 cm, Private Collection

Detail of the William Sadler II (c. 1782-1839), A View of Dublin and Dublin Bay, from the estate of the Earl of Charlemont (c. 1810) Oil on panel, 36 x 55 cm, Private Collection

Best wishes

Melissa